Stress is an underlying cause of hair loss!


75% of adults reported experiencing moderate to high levels of stress in the past month and that their stress has increased in the past year. (1) This percentage has likely increased due to the current COVID-19 pandemic.
 

Both acute and chronic stress can disrupt hair growth.

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Traditionally, during periods of increased stress, cortisol signals the hair follicle to prematurely shift from anagen to telogen, where hair prepares to shed three to six months later. (2, 3) However, repeated exposure to stressful situations such as emotional, relationship, finance, employment, and physical health problems also play a role in the disruption of normal hair growth cycling. (4)
 

For years conventional medicine has viewed hair loss as the result of either hereditary or acquired factors. It is now understood that hair loss is multifactorial and that there may be more similarities than differences across the hair loss disorder spectrum, one of which is stress.  (4) Studies have found that stress results in:

  • Release of cortisol, which induces catagen and follicle regression. (5)
  • Release of substance P, a stress-associated neuropeptide that modulates inflammation in the skin and collapses immune privilege surrounding the follicle opening it to attack. (6-9)
  • Release of corticotropin- releasing hormone, which binds to the follicle, inducing further production of local stress hormones and hair growth arrest. (2)


Stress not only has a direct effect on the hair follicle, but indirect effects via other systems in the body including the endocrine and digestive systems. Over time constant activation of the central stress response leads to disruption of hypothalamic feedback loops, namely thyroid and reproductive hormones - all of which play a role in regulating hair growth and quality. (10-13) With chronic stress, gut microbiome shifts potentiate mucosal permeability, system-wide inflammation, and malabsorption, many of which are implicated in hair loss disorders. (14-17)


There are no medications available to address stress or stress-related hair thinning.


Nutrafol is a clinically effective nutraceutical that improves hair growth and thickness by multi-targeting root causes of hair thinning, including stress. (4, 18)

Exclusive to Nutrafol, Sensoril® ashwagandha is a medical- grade stress adaptogen shown to lower elevated cortisol levels in adults and assist in helping the body adapt to external stimuli to build stress resistance. (19, 20) Ashwagandha is part of Synergen Complex®, a proprietary blend of standardized botanical extracts clinically tested to target the negative effects of stress including DHT sensitivity, oxidative stress, and a rise in inflammatory cytokines. (4)

In recent clinical studies, both men and women with self perceived thinning hair reported improved hair growth, thickness, and less shedding after six months.

Purchase Your Supply of Nutrafol Today

Click Here to Get Nutrafol for Healthy Hair


DISCLAIMER
The information contained here is for information purposes only. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking any medications or have a medical condition, consult your doctor before using. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


References

1. Association of the Global Organization for Stress, 2020.

2. Thom, Erling. (2016). Stress and the Hair Growth Cycle: Cortisol-Induced Hair Growth Disruption. Journal of drugs in dermatology : JDD. 15.1001-1004.

3. American Hair Loss Association, 2020.

4. Sadick NS, Callender VD, Kircik LH, Kogan S. New Insight Into the Pathophysiology of Hair Loss Trigger a Paradigm Shift in the Treatment Approach. JDrugsDermatology 2017;16 (11):s135-s140.

5. Peters, E. M., Arck, P. C., & Paus, R. (2006). Hair growth inhibition by psychoemotional stress: a mouse model for neural mechanisms in hair growth control. Experimental dermatology, 15(1), 1-13.

6. Arck, P. C., Handjiski, B., Hagen, E., Joachim, R., Klapp, B. F., & Paus, R. (2001). Indications for a ‘brain–hair follicle axis (BHA)’: inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation and up-regulation of keratinocyte apoptosis in telogen hair follicles by stress and substance P. The FASEB Journal, 15(13), 2536-2538

7. Arck, P. C., Handjiski, B., Kuhlmei, A., Peters, E. M., Knackstedt, M., Peter, A., ... & Paus, R. (2005). Mast cell deficient and neurokinin-1 receptor knockout mice are protected from stress-induced hair growth inhibition. Journal of molecular medicine, 83(5), 386-396.

8. Arck, P. C., Handjiski, B., Peters, E. M. J., Peter, A. S., Hagen, E., Fischer, A., ... & Paus, R. (2003). Stress inhibits hair growth in mice by induction of premature catagen development and deleterious perifollicular inflammatory events via neuropeptide substance P-dependent pathways. The American journal of pathology, 162(3), 803-814.

9. Peters, Eva M J et al. “Probing the effects of stress mediators on the human hair follicle: substance P holds central position.” The American journal of pathology vol. 171,6 (2007): 1872-86. doi:10.2353/ajpath.2007.061206

10. Guilliams TG, Edwards L. Chronic Stress and the HPA Axis: Clinical Assessment and Therapeutic Considerations. The Standard. 2010;9(2). Textbook of Functional Medicine. Gig Harbor, WA: The Institute for Functional Medicine; 2010.

11. Moura Neto A, Zantut-Wittmann DE. Abnormalities of Thyroid Hormone Metabolism during Systemic Illness: The Low T3 Syndrome in Different Clinical Settings. Int J Endocrinol. 2016;2016:2157583.

12. van Beek N, Bodo E, Kromminga A, et al. Thyroid hormones directly alter human hair follicle functions: anagen prolongation and stimulation of both hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation and hair pigmentation. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008;93(11):4381-4388.

13. Paus R, Langan EA, Vidali S, Ramot Y, Andersen B. Neuroendocrinology of the hair follicle: principles and clinical perspectives. Trends Mol Med. 2014;20(10):559-570.

14. Eoin Sherwin KVS, Timothy G. Dinan, and John F. Cryan. May the Force Be With You: The Light and Dark Sides of the Microbiota–Gut–Brain Axis in Neuropsychiatry. CNS Drugs. 2016;30(11):1019-1041

15. Kober MM, Bowe WP. The effect of probiotics on immune regulation, acne, and photoaging. International journal of women's dermatology. 2015;1(2):85-89.

16. Finner AM. Nutrition and hair: deficiencies and supplements. Dermatol Clin. 2013;31(1):167-172.

17. Jaworsky, C., A.M. Kligman, and G.F. Murphy, Characterization of inflammatory infiltrates in male pattern alopecia: implications for pathogenesis. Br J Dermatol, 1992. 127(3): p. 239-46.

18. Ablon G, Kogan S. A Six-Month, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of a Nutraceutical Supplement for Promoting Hair Growth in Women With Self-Perceived Thinning Hair. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(5):558-565.

19. Lopresti, A., Smith, S., Malvi, H., et al. (2019). An investigation into the stress-relieving and pharmacological actions of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) extract. Medicine (Baltimore). Sep; 98(37).

20. Auddy B HJ, Mitra A, Abedon B, Ghosal S. A Standardized Withania Somnifera Extract Significantly Reduces Stress-Related Parameters in Chronically Stressed Humans: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study. Journal of American Nutraceutical Association. 2008;11(1):50-66.


Click Here to Get Nutrafol for Healthy Hair


DISCLAIMER
The information contained here is for information purposes only. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking any medications or have a medical condition, consult your doctor before using. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


References

1. Association of the Global Organization for Stress, 2020.

2. Thom, Erling. (2016). Stress and the Hair Growth Cycle: Cortisol-Induced Hair Growth Disruption. Journal of drugs in dermatology : JDD. 15.1001-1004.

3. American Hair Loss Association, 2020.

4. Sadick NS, Callender VD, Kircik LH, Kogan S. New Insight Into the Pathophysiology of Hair Loss Trigger a Paradigm Shift in the Treatment Approach. JDrugsDermatology 2017;16 (11):s135-s140.

5. Peters, E. M., Arck, P. C., & Paus, R. (2006). Hair growth inhibition by psychoemotional stress: a mouse model for neural mechanisms in hair growth control. Experimental dermatology, 15(1), 1-13.

6. Arck, P. C., Handjiski, B., Hagen, E., Joachim, R., Klapp, B. F., & Paus, R. (2001). Indications for a ‘brain–hair follicle axis (BHA)’: inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation and up-regulation of keratinocyte apoptosis in telogen hair follicles by stress and substance P. The FASEB Journal, 15(13), 2536-2538

7. Arck, P. C., Handjiski, B., Kuhlmei, A., Peters, E. M., Knackstedt, M., Peter, A., ... & Paus, R. (2005). Mast cell deficient and neurokinin-1 receptor knockout mice are protected from stress-induced hair growth inhibition. Journal of molecular medicine, 83(5), 386-396.

8. Arck, P. C., Handjiski, B., Peters, E. M. J., Peter, A. S., Hagen, E., Fischer, A., ... & Paus, R. (2003). Stress inhibits hair growth in mice by induction of premature catagen development and deleterious perifollicular inflammatory events via neuropeptide substance P-dependent pathways. The American journal of pathology, 162(3), 803-814.

9. Peters, Eva M J et al. “Probing the effects of stress mediators on the human hair follicle: substance P holds central position.” The American journal of pathology vol. 171,6 (2007): 1872-86. doi:10.2353/ajpath.2007.061206

10. Guilliams TG, Edwards L. Chronic Stress and the HPA Axis: Clinical Assessment and Therapeutic Considerations. The Standard. 2010;9(2). Textbook of Functional Medicine. Gig Harbor, WA: The Institute for Functional Medicine; 2010.

11. Moura Neto A, Zantut-Wittmann DE. Abnormalities of Thyroid Hormone Metabolism during Systemic Illness: The Low T3 Syndrome in Different Clinical Settings. Int J Endocrinol. 2016;2016:2157583.

12. van Beek N, Bodo E, Kromminga A, et al. Thyroid hormones directly alter human hair follicle functions: anagen prolongation and stimulation of both hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation and hair pigmentation. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008;93(11):4381-4388.

13. Paus R, Langan EA, Vidali S, Ramot Y, Andersen B. Neuroendocrinology of the hair follicle: principles and clinical perspectives. Trends Mol Med. 2014;20(10):559-570.

14. Eoin Sherwin KVS, Timothy G. Dinan, and John F. Cryan. May the Force Be With You: The Light and Dark Sides of the Microbiota–Gut–Brain Axis in Neuropsychiatry. CNS Drugs. 2016;30(11):1019-1041

15. Kober MM, Bowe WP. The effect of probiotics on immune regulation, acne, and photoaging. International journal of women's dermatology. 2015;1(2):85-89.

16. Finner AM. Nutrition and hair: deficiencies and supplements. Dermatol Clin. 2013;31(1):167-172.

17. Jaworsky, C., A.M. Kligman, and G.F. Murphy, Characterization of inflammatory infiltrates in male pattern alopecia: implications for pathogenesis. Br J Dermatol, 1992. 127(3): p. 239-46.

18. Ablon G, Kogan S. A Six-Month, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of a Nutraceutical Supplement for Promoting Hair Growth in Women With Self-Perceived Thinning Hair. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(5):558-565.

19. Lopresti, A., Smith, S., Malvi, H., et al. (2019). An investigation into the stress-relieving and pharmacological actions of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) extract. Medicine (Baltimore). Sep; 98(37).

20. Auddy B HJ, Mitra A, Abedon B, Ghosal S. A Standardized Withania Somnifera Extract Significantly Reduces Stress-Related Parameters in Chronically Stressed Humans: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study. Journal of American Nutraceutical Association. 2008;11(1):50-66.